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Bacilli And Bullets
Sir William Osler, one of the greatest medical men in the w...

Rupert Brooke
Among the losses that the World War has caused--many of the...

Son
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At School Near The Lines
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The World War
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The Murder Of Captain Fryatt
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The Beast In Man
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The Belgian Prince
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Edith Cavell
Americans are particularly interested in the story of Edith...

The Battles Of The Marne
At Marathon (490 B.C.) and at Salamis (480 B.C.) the Greeks...

The Hun Target The Red Cross
All the civilized nations of the world have agreed to respe...

Carry On!
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Marshal Foch
A Great German philosopher said many years ago that history...

The Shot Heard Round The World
On April 19, 1775, was fired "the shot heard round the worl...

Killing The Soul
As the centuries pass, the greatest glory of any nation, it...

The God In Man
A soldier on the firing step, aiming at the enemy, is sudde...

Birdmen
Although I am an American, I am still in the French aviatio...

A Belgian Lawyer's Appeal
One of the great lawyers of Belgium in behalf of the member...

Daring The Undarable
We are thirty in the hands of Fate And thirty-one wi...

Alan Seeger
As England and the world lost Rupert Brooke, so America and...



A Ballad Of French Rivers






Of streams that men take honor in
The Frenchman looks to three,
And each one has for origin
The hills of Burgundy;
And each has known the quivers
Of blood and tears and pain--
O gallant bleeding rivers,
The Marne, the Meuse, the Aisne.

Says Marne: "My poplar fringes
Have felt the Prussian tread,
The blood of brave men tinges
My banks with lasting red;
Let others ask due credit,
But France has me to thank;
Von Kluck himself has said it:
I turned the Boche's flank!"

Says Meuse: "I claim no winning,
No glory on the stage;
Save that, in the beginning
I strove to save LiƩge.
Alas! that Frankish rivers
Should share such shame as mine--
In spite of all endeavors
I flow to join the Rhine!"

Says Aisne: "My silver shallows
Are salter than the sea,
The woe of Rheims still hallows
My endless tragedy.
Of rivers rich in story
That run through green Champagne,
In agony and glory,
The chief am I, the Aisne!"

Now there are greater waters
That Frenchmen all hold dear--
The Rhone, with many daughters,
That runs so icy clear;
There's Moselle, deep and winy,
There's Loire, Garonne and Seine.
But O the valiant tiny--
The Marne, the Meuse, the Aisne!

CHRISTOPHER MORLEY.

* * * * *

A river is the most human and companionable of all inanimate things. It
has a life, a character, a voice of its own; and is as full of
good-fellowship as a sugar-maple is of sap. It can talk in various
tones, loud or low; and of many subjects, grave or gay.

HENRY VAN DYKE.

FOOTNOTES:

[6] COPYRIGHT BY GEORGE H. DORAN COMPANY





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