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The United States At War--at Home
When any nation declares war, it immediately brings upon itse...

Redeemed Italy
Italy, since 1860 at least, has cherished the dream that some...

Harry Lauder Sings
Harry Lauder, an extremely popular Scotch singer and entertai...

President Wilson In France
On December 14, 1918, President Wilson arrived in Paris. He ...

The United States Marines
Our flag's unfurled to every breeze From dawn to setti...

The Soldiers Who Go To Sea
If the army or the navy ever gaze on Heaven's scenes, Th...

The Poilu
The soldier of France, the poilu, is a crusader. He is fight...

The United States At War--in France
Adapted with a few omissions and changes in language from the...

The Quality Of Mercy
There is an old saying, Like king, like people, which means t...

I Knew You Would Come
We are all very proud that America was permitted to have a sh...

When The Tide Turned
THE AMERICAN ATTACK AT CHATEAU-THIERRY AND BELLEAU WOOD IN TH...

Pershing At The Tomb Of Lafayette
They knew they were fighting our war. As the months gr...

The Tommy
John Masefield, the English writer, says, St. George did not ...

November 11 1918
Sinners are said sometimes to repent and change their ways at...

Duty
So nigh is grandeur to our dust, So near is God to man...

Fighting A Depth Bomb
All who have read of the sinking of the Lusitania, by a torpe...

To Villingen--and Back
Very remarkable in the world struggle for liberty was the eag...

The Capture Of Dun
After the Americans had cleared the Saint Mihiel salient, Mar...

Joyce Kilmer
The first poet and author in the American army to give up his...

The Unspeakable Turk
Although the great issues of the war were decided, and victor...



Where The Tide Turned






It is the general impression that the tide of victory set in with
Marshal Foch's splendid movement against the German flank on July 18th.
That movement, it is true, started the irresistible sweep of the wave
which was destined to engulf and destroy the hideous power of
Prussianism. But the tide which gathered and drove forward the waters
out of which that wave arose, had turned before. It turned with and
through the supreme valor of our marines and other American troops in
the first battle at Chateau-Thierry and at Belleau Wood, in the
first week of June.

The American force engaged was small, measured by the standard of
numbers to which we have become accustomed in this war, but the story
of their fighting will remain immortal and in its psychological and
strategic consequences the action will take rank, I believe, among the
decisive battles of the war.

I am not speaking from hearsay. I was in France during the week
preceding that battle, the most anxious and gloomy period, probably, of
the entire war. What I am about to relate is based either on
authoritative information gathered on the spot, or on my own
observations. In telling it, nothing is farther from my thoughts than





Next: To Wish To Take Away One From The Immortal Glory Which Belongs

Previous: When The Tide Turned



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