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Alsace-lorraine
On slight pretext, Germany in 1864 and in 1866 had made wars ...

America Enters The War
SPEECH BY LLOYD GEORGE, BRITISH PREMIER, APRIL 12, 1917 ...

The Unspeakable Turk
Although the great issues of the war were decided, and victor...

Waiting For The Flash
Not at once can the mind grasp the full significance of the w...

The Yank
The boche went into the war as a robber, the poilu as a crusa...

The Call To Arms In Our Street
There's a woman sobs her heart out, With her head agains...

Bombing Metz
ADAPTED FROM THE ACCOUNT WRITTEN BY RAOUL LUFBERY In Janua...

The United States At War--at Home
When any nation declares war, it immediately brings upon itse...

Where The Four Winds Meet
There are songs of the north and songs of the south, A...

The Searchlights
Political morality differs from individual morality, because ...

Vive La France 1
The determination of the people of Alsace and Lorraine not ...

At The Front
What one soldier writes, millions have experienced. At f...

Nations Born And Reborn
In America, and in many other countries, people have listened...

The Thirteenth Regiment
The World War has shown clearly that all peoples are not alik...

A Congressional Message
FROM PRESIDENT WILSON'S ANNUAL ADDRESS TO CONGRESS DECEMBE...

Redeemed Italy
Italy, since 1860 at least, has cherished the dream that some...

The Little Old Road
There's a breath of May in the breeze On the little ol...

Joyce Kilmer
The first poet and author in the American army to give up his...

The United States Marines
Our flag's unfurled to every breeze From dawn to setti...

Trees
I think that I shall never see A poem lovely as a tree. ...



Where The Tide Turned






It is the general impression that the tide of victory set in with
Marshal Foch's splendid movement against the German flank on July 18th.
That movement, it is true, started the irresistible sweep of the wave
which was destined to engulf and destroy the hideous power of
Prussianism. But the tide which gathered and drove forward the waters
out of which that wave arose, had turned before. It turned with and
through the supreme valor of our marines and other American troops in
the first battle at Chateau-Thierry and at Belleau Wood, in the
first week of June.

The American force engaged was small, measured by the standard of
numbers to which we have become accustomed in this war, but the story
of their fighting will remain immortal and in its psychological and
strategic consequences the action will take rank, I believe, among the
decisive battles of the war.

I am not speaking from hearsay. I was in France during the week
preceding that battle, the most anxious and gloomy period, probably, of
the entire war. What I am about to relate is based either on
authoritative information gathered on the spot, or on my own
observations. In telling it, nothing is farther from my thoughts than





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