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The Lost Battalion
On December 24, 1918, Lieutenant Colonel Charles W. Whittlese...

The Second Line Of Defense
In Norwich, England, stands a memorial which will forever be ...

The Searchlights
Political morality differs from individual morality, because ...

The United States At War--at Home
When any nation declares war, it immediately brings upon itse...

Vive La France 1
The determination of the people of Alsace and Lorraine not ...

Nations Born And Reborn
In America, and in many other countries, people have listened...

The Unspeakable Turk
Although the great issues of the war were decided, and victor...

The Miner And The Tiger
On an October day in 1866, David Lloyd George, then a little ...

A Congressional Message
FROM PRESIDENT WILSON'S ANNUAL ADDRESS TO CONGRESS DECEMBE...

The Tommy
John Masefield, the English writer, says, St. George did not ...

The Thirteenth Regiment
The World War has shown clearly that all peoples are not alik...

The Really Invincible Armada
The northern coast of Scotland is about as far north as the s...

Where The Tide Turned
It is the general impression that the tide of victory set in ...

Where Are You Going Great-heart?
Where are you going, Great-Heart, With your eager face...

Joyce Kilmer
The first poet and author in the American army to give up his...

Redeemed Italy
Italy, since 1860 at least, has cherished the dream that some...

November 11 1918
Sinners are said sometimes to repent and change their ways at...

The United States At War--in France
Adapted with a few omissions and changes in language from the...

To Villingen--and Back
Very remarkable in the world struggle for liberty was the eag...

The Fleet That Lost Its Soul
Sailors and especially fighters on the sea have in all ages p...



A Carol From Flanders






1914

In Flanders on the Christmas morn
The trenched foemen lay,
The German and the Briton born--
And it was Christmas Day.

The red sun rose on fields accurst,
The gray fog fled away;
But neither cared to fire the first,
For it was Christmas Day.

They called from each to each across
The hideous disarray
(For terrible had been their loss):
O, this is Christmas Day!

Their rifles all they set aside,
One impulse to obey;
'Twas just the men on either side,
Just men--and Christmas Day.

They dug the graves for all their dead
And over them did pray;
And Englishman and German said:
How strange a Christmas Day!

Between the trenches then they met,
Shook hands, and e'en did play
At games on which their hearts are set
On happy Christmas Day.

Not all the Emperors and Kings,
Financiers, and they
Who rule us could prevent these things
For it was Christmas Day.

O ye who read this truthful rime
From Flanders, kneel and say:
God speed the time when every day
Shall be as Christmas Day.

FREDERICK NIVEN.





Next: The Miner And The Tiger

Previous: At The Front



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